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Southern Crossings Tour Diary – Sunday, 23 August – Day 1

August 25, 2015

Changi Airport – Singapore: 18.04

It is a common thing, before a big trip, for people to ask – ‘are you excited for Australia?’

My response is always the same, ‘No. But I will be when I get there.’ I don’t tend to ‘look forward’ in that way, to dream of how good something or someplace will be. I don’t check the weather. I do not buy a Lonely Planet.

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Managing Expectations @ Changi Airport

I’m sure I’m not the only one who manages expectations in this way. Surely there are people who won’t read reviews before seeing the film.

However, my friends David Stavanger & Annie Te Whiu (co-directors of this year’s Queensland Poetry Festival) suggested I write a blog, maybe telling people how excited I am to be part of the Scottish cohort heading to QPF this year.

Well, as I said, I don’t get excited before things but I’m 99% sure to be excitedly drinking with them after the gig. And, honestly, performance artist MacGillivray & my old friend William Letford have consistently delivered performances which live inside me. It is a semi-eclectic bill – the three of us – but one that speaks to the programmers’ attraction to poems which are crafted and can exist on the page but also to poets who know how to read and perform their work, who are willing to collaborate & experiment with music, noise, voice to create something unique for the live audience. Together, we’re going to try to do that.

18.23 – Poets are the new whalers

Being in this airport so far from both my Scottish & American homes reminds me of something Jane Hirshfield once quipped to me – ‘poets are the new whalers’ – she emailed as we kept almost being in the same city at the same time a few years back.

There’s not much money or fame in our line of work but man, she was right, some of us lucky ones get to criss-cross the globe. I’ve been to Lebanon & Iraq with Letford, seen David Stavanger in Edinburgh, St Andrews and Brisbane and after this jaunt MacGillivray is flying straight to LA for more gigs.

The worrying thought occurs that maybe we’re not the whalers but the whales. Or maybe the great poem is the whale, the impossible, illusive, destructive thing that we (as writers) chase along with audiences (as readers) – both of us Ahab. Manically, scanning the seas for that brilliant white one.

18.45 – I Never Really Left

I sat down with a Laksa soup and realized I still had my Edinburgh International Book Festival lanyard in my back pocket.

Laksa & Lanyard

Laksa & Lanyard

I think I’ll keep it with me as I go from the Melbourne Writers Festival to the Queensland Poetry Festival. It will remind me of the conversations had in Edinburgh with Mexican poets & writers, with critics, with Sami & Inuit poets, with author musicians like John Darnielle and almost certainly the threads will continue, a global conversation, a global village.

Some Threads in My Head

— The visiting Mexican poet Monica de la Torre said that writing the poem is as important as the poem, that the act of writing is a learning process, that she doesn’t know what she wants to say when she starts and the act of writing is the act of discovery (paraphrasing from memory here, sorry Monica). It was a heartening idea to hear articulated in front of a crowd and I wonder, if I like the writers who have a process which is similar to mine,  who are not making an argument but are charting a journey to an argument? And is that fair to the writers who don’t write that way — who start with an argument and work towards it?

— Would intellectualsnob.com be a good website? Am I an intellectual snob? Or, as the writer & critic Stuart Kelly said, do I believe in an ‘elitism for all’? 

— Is performance poetry / slam poetry / spoken word a capitalist construct because it monitizes poetry via crowd pleasing activities? (as suggested in The Guardian comments section, here) Or, more generously, is it populist and speaking to ‘the people’?

— David Stavanger, Mr Ghostboy, who himself straddles the twin stallions of both page poetry & spoken word will have something to say about this, no doubt. It is reflected in his programming & of course in his work of which there is much I admire. I surprise myself by sincerely looking forward to that conversation. I suspect he will say what I know deep down — that good is good & bad is bad and labels, like flags, are stupid.

— I think to myself, ‘Language does more than order a cup of coffee. Language does more than ‘communicate’ on the most obvious level. Language does more than say, ‘2 dollars fifty cents, thank you’. The visiting Mexican poet, Gabriela Jauregui, said something along the lines that poetry / language diverts the ‘transactional’, and also that poetry can overcome the language of (what she called) ‘necrocapitalism’ in Mexico.

 — Jessie Kleeman pushed language far out in her hypnotic & moving Jura Unbound performance as part of Highlight Arts‘ ‘Head North, My Friend‘. At one point she asked, ‘what will we do without dogs when the ice melts? Build factories to turn them into food?’ Ouch.

— Highlight Arts‘ ‘Head North, My Friend‘ took place on the day President Obama gave permission for Shell to drill in the Arctic.

— This classic clip from Orson Welles’ The Third Man has been going around my head thanks to the visiting Mexican journalist Juan Villoro.

 

— Does making art require suffering, violence, blood? If you had the choice, would you want to be Switzerland or Italy? I was glad I got to ask that of John Darnielle &  Gavin Extence who both have suffered & seen suffering first hand.

 

 

18.55 – I Better Go Now

I think my flight is boarding and this airport is big. I’m also mildly curious about ‘how to become a Changhi Airport Millionaire’ – would that be a millionaire only in the confines of this airport. Like The Terminal but with Donald Trump as Tom Hanks?

I’ll be performing with William Letford & MacGillivary at The Toff in Town, Melbourne. Wednesday 26 August
We’ll be joining the Queensland Poetry Festival on Thursday the 27th. Check the listings here.
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With grateful acknowledgement to Creative Scotland for financial assistance.
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Alvin Pang on the Prairie Schooner

October 25, 2013

My fascinating chat with Singapore poet Alvin Pang about the interaction of cultures in his home city, Singlish and his granny’s aphorisms has been published on the Prairie Schooner.

Ryan Frequents a Speakeasy

October 3, 2013

During my continued adventures around the globe, I’ll be in Artistry in Singapore as part of their Speakeasy series. If you’re in town come join us!

What: Speakeasy #6

Where: 17 Jalan Pinang, Singapore 199149.

When: 12 October 2013, 19:00 – 22:00.

Ryan Is a World Voice in Singapore

September 28, 2013

Shortly after my voyage to Australia I’ll be hitting Singapore for a show alongside Alvin Pang, an awesome poet and thoroughly personable fellow.
World Voices features Ryan Van Winkle
 9 October, 7.30pm, Earshot Café, 1 Old Parliament Lane, Singapore.

Ryan Van Winkle is an American poet who resides in Edinburgh, Scotland. His incredibly personal and intimate poetry-theatre experiment Red, Like Our Room Used to Feel, which has been showcased at the 2012 Edinburgh Fringe amongst other places, has been known to captivate even those who shun poetry.

Join us as he reads from his evocative poetry, and presents a treat in the form of his ViewMaster. Ryan’s ViewMaster is a personal slide-show performance that is at times surprising and surreal, and offers viewers a chance to travel through scenes with your eyes and ears.

This session will be moderated by Alvin Pang, a noted and award winning poet.
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Alvin Pang Talks Singapore Literature on the SPL Podcast

April 27, 2013

In one fascinating conversation, Singaporean poet Alvin Pang discusses language identity, Singapore literature and poetic practice with at the StAnza 2013 poetry festival. Alvin reads his poems and a selection from his anthology TUMASIK: Contemporary Writing from Singapore. Alvin has a great sense of humour, a marvelous reading voice, and shares some razor-sharp perspectives on the political power of both his poetry and its playfulness. Elsewhere, he talks about how Seamus Heaney influenced his work, his grandmother’s deadly Cantonese aphorisms and he reads a poem of his written in the distinctive unofficial language of Singapore, Singlish, the existence of which, he argues, has huge potential political power. I learned a lot, and if you click the play button, I just know you will too.

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